More Downloadable Word Study Tools...

Jul 21, 2011 by

Yesterday I was working with some grades 3-5 teachers and a 5th grade teacher asked if it is necessary for her to have a word wall.  That led us into a discussion about using personal word walls with those students who still need this support.  Click here to read about one way to use a personal word wall and to download a reproducible for your students’ writer’s notebooks or journals. ————————————————————————————————————————————— In my last blogpost I shared some word family cards that you can use to help students learn the 37 most common phonograms (rimes, chunks).  Today I am providing some more downloadable word cards.  This is a set of the 150 Most Frequent Words.  These are words that account for a large percentage of words in print but often have irregular spelling patterns. ...

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High-Frequency Word Cards

Jul 21, 2011 by

Did you know that: only 13 words (a, and, for, he, is, in, it, of, that, the, to, was, you) account for 25% of the words in print? 100 words account for approximately 50%? 250 words make up 70-75% of all the words children use in their writing?                                                 —from Phonics from A to Z by Wiley Blevins These statistics make it very clear that we must help students master these high-frequency words if they are to become fluent readers and writers.  Because most of these words are irregularly spelled, they cannot be taught the same way we teach words that contain phonograms or word families.  Children need repeated exposure to these words so that they can acquire a visual memory for them.  In some previous articles, I have shared the following effective techniques:...

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Personal Word Wall

Jul 21, 2011 by

Word walls are great tools for teaching vocabulary, high-frequency words, and word patterns.  It is often a challenge to get students to use these tools, however.  "Word Wall Bobs" provide great opportunities for students to have repeated exposure to the words on our word walls and for encouraging students to use them independently. Some children still struggle, however, to use the word wall as a resource for spelling in their daily writing because they can’t make the transfer from the wall to their papers.  If you have students who have difficulty making this transfer, you might want to try using a personal word wall.  Here is one that I created for some students this year: Download Personal Word Wall How it works: Photocopy the form above onto 8 1/2” x 11”cardstock. Cut off the...

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FREE Word Family Cards

Jul 19, 2011 by

I recently presented a workshop on spelling strategies to some 1st and 2nd grade teachers in Dallas and Kansas City. Part of the discussion focused on the importance of using onset and rimes in our word study instruction. A few teachers asked for a copy of my word family cards, so I decided they might be helpful to all of you, too.  Click here to read more about onsets and rimes and to download a set of FREE word family cards for the 37 most common rimes.     Become a follower of Teacher2TeacherHelp on Facebook. Share...

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Onsets and Rimes / Phonograms / Word Families...

Jul 19, 2011 by

Follow the link at the bottom of this post for some FREE downloadable word family cards that you can use to help your primary students learn some basic phonics patterns. First, a quick review: What are onsets and rimes? An onset is the consonant(s) before the vowel(s) in a syllable: /m/ in mind /str/ in street Not all syllables have an onset (it and and do not have onsets).   A rime (A.K.A. a phonogram) is the first vowel in a syllable and whatever follows: /ind/ in mind /eet/ in street All syllables have a rime. Why should we use them in our word study instruction? Onsets and rimes are important because: they are the most psychologically accessible units of sound that may be mapped to a spelling pattern (Goswami, 1996). rimes (also referred...

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Smart Answers to Tough Questions...

Oct 1, 2010 by

Yesterday I wrote about a question many of our students ask us when they are writing:  “How do you spell…?”  I also shared some insights on invented/temporary spelling and ways to encourage our children not to rely on us when they are drafting.  That made me think of another issue this question raises.  What do you do when a parent or an administrator questions a teaching practice that you know is best for children?  What would you say if a parent said, “My child brings home stories she’s written that are full of spelling errors.  She spells words the way they sound.  You didn’t write any corrections on her paper so she’s being taught bad habits.  Why not make her copy words over and over until she gets them right?”  Even if you know...

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